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The Economic Benefits of Improved Accessibility to Transport Systems Roundtable

Paris , France , 3 - 4 March 2016
Chair:
Quemuel Arroyo, Policy Analyst for Accessibility and ADA Coordinator at the New York City Department of Transportation

Multimedia

Chair's Summary

Accessibility Benefits Roundtable - Chair's Summary

Papers and presentations

The Economic Benefits of Improved Accessibility to Transport Systems: Roundtable Summary and Conclusions new

pdf View Discussion Paper (PDF) (1.21 MB)
Discussion Paper, 22 December 2016
  • Lorenzo Casullo
    International Transport Forum, Paris, France

Towards a Framework for Identifying and Measuring the Benefits of Accessibility

pdf View Presentation, slides, speech (PDF) (766.14 KB)
Presentation, slides, speech, 3 March 2016
  • Daphne Federing
  • David Lewis

Towards a Framework for Identifying and Measuring the Benefits of Accessibility

Benefits and Costs of Inclusion in Transport

pdf View Presentation, slides, speech (PDF) (2.27 MB)
Presentation, slides, speech, 3 March 2016
  • Bridget Burdett
    Senior Transportation Researcher, TDG
  • Stuart Locke
  • Frank Scrimgeour

Benefits and Costs of Inclusion in Transport

The Role of Accessible Transport in Fostering Tourism for All

pdf View Presentation, slides, speech (PDF) (763.83 KB)
Presentation, slides, speech, 3 March 2016
  • Marcus Rebstock
    Institut Verkehr und Raum

The Role of Accessible Transport in Fostering Tourism for All

Access for All: The Benefits of Improving Accessibility of Rail Stations

pdf View Presentation, slides, speech (PDF) (1.77 MB)
Presentation, slides, speech, 4 March 2016
  • Tony Duckenfield
    steer davies gleave

Access for All: The Benefits of Improving Accessibility of Rail Stations

Scope

Factors such as age, disability, and to a different extent travelling with young children or with heavy luggage, impede the mobility of transport users. There are both global instruments and national laws which recognize the importance of making transport systems more accessible for these groups of users.

Therefore a key objective of transport policy and planning should be to guarantee and enhance accessibility, but progress is this field is constrained by competing demands for funding, and an often unclear understanding of the economic benefits of improved accessibility. Benefits should be better defined, quantified an incorporated in a consistent appraisal framework that values accessibility improvements appropriately.

In the absence of adequate appraisal, policymakers may fail to incorporate considerations of the benefits of improved accessibility in long-term decisions and plans. They might also struggle to make decisions on the appropriate allocation of responsibilities in this area of investment. In addition, the cost of inaction (in terms of foregone benefits) is often large and not accounted for.